Posts Tagged ‘MSHA’

MSHA Part 46 and Part 48 Certification Classes

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Safety Training Resources is now offering MSHA Part 46 and Part 48 classes. These classes meet the training requirements set forth by MSHA using approved training plans and are conducted by Jeff Viehmann, a certified MSHA instructor.

Dates for the classes are: September 24-27, 2013 and October 29 – November 1, 2013. Classes will be held in Old Monroe, Missouri, located west of St. Charles County off Interstate 70 and Highway 79.

Class size is limited and the cost per person per day is $125.00. For more details and to download a Course Registration Form, go to www.safetytrainingresources.com or call 314-808-3502.


MSHA Releases “Rules to Live By” Initiative

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

In an effort to prevent fatalities in the mining industry (metal/nonmetal & coal), MSHA recently released the top frequently cited standards (11 in coal mining and 13 in metal/nonmetal) that cause or contribute to fatal accidents in the mining industry in 9 accident catagories.

The goal of this initiative is to prevent miners from losing their lives in preventable accidents. From 2000-2009, 623 miners lost their lives. As a result, MSHA analyzed data from these accidents to identify conditions and practices that contributed to these deaths.

The 13 frequently cited standards for the Metal/Nonmetal industry that resulted in a fatality are as follows:

Operating speeds and control of equipment
Work on power circuits
Brake performance
Procedures during repairs or maintenance
Seat belts shall be worn by equipment operators
Seat belts shall be provided and worn in haul trucks
Machinery, equipment, and tools used beyond design
Parking procedures for unattended equipment
Safety belts and lines
Bins, hoppers, silos, tanks, and surge piles
Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads
Barricades and warning signs
Ground support use

The nine accident categories are:
Falls from Elevation
Falls of Roof and Rib
Operating Mobile Equipment (Surface)
Operating Mobile Equipment (Underground)
Maintenance
Lockout/Tagout
Struck by Mobile Equipment (Surface)
Struck by Mobile Equipment (Underground)
Blocking Against Motion

There is no doubt that compliance with safety and health standards should be the focus of mine operators. Safety Training Resources supports MSHA and their efforts to provide education on ways the mining industry can improve mine safety and health. There is no reason why one more family has to hear that their loved one has been killed while on the job.

To read the complete “Rules to Live By” Initiative visit www.msha.gov/focuson/RulestoLiveBy.


Safety Training Resources Prepares Missouri Employers for New National Standard – I2P2

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

A dozen states currently require employers to have an Injury & Illness Prevention Program (IIPP or I2P2) in place, and both OSHA and MSHA are working around the clock to enact a new national standard that will make them mandatory for employers nationwide.

I2P2s encompass everything from a management commitment to a safe and healthful work environment to formalizing the system by which an employer communicates safety policy, informs employees of hazards, and encourages workers to report safety risks without fear of reprisal.

Fortunately, many of the required components may already be in place at your worksite in some form. But most organizations – even those with solid safety programs – will have to do some serious work to get into full compliance with the new requirement. You don’t want to put it off and face a last-minute scramble (which could leave you less than fully compliant with the new rules).

 Safety Training Resources believes that the I2P2 rule will include the following elements:

1. Management duties (including items such as establishing a policy, setting goals, planning and allocating resources, and assigning and communicating roles and responsibilities);

2. Employee participation (including items such as involving employees in establishing, maintaining and evaluating the program, employee access to safety and health information, and employee role in incident investigations);

3. Hazard identification and assessment (including items such as what hazards must be identified, information gathering, workplace inspections, incident investigations, hazards associated with changes in the workplace, emergency hazards, hazard assessment and prioritization, and hazard identification tools)

4. Hazard prevention and control (including items such as what hazards must be controlled, hazard control priorities, and the effectiveness of the controls);

5. Program evaluation and improvement (including items such as monitoring performance, correcting program deficiencies, and improving program performance).

Safety Training Resources will:

  • Explain what OSHA and MSHA are proposing in terms of an I2P2 requirement, and how it will affect your business
  • Educate you on the steps you must take to prove your commitment to controlling workplace hazards and correcting dangerous conditions
  • Explain the 5 key components of a written I2P2 plan
  • Help you determine how to assign responsibilities for on-site and job site safety
  • Assist you in creating a system that assures employee compliance with your I2P2 plan and regulations
  • Identify what needs to be included in your safety communications - including meetings, training, notifications, and postings – and how to readily communicate to every worker what they need to do to operate safely in your workplace

Safety Training Resources is scheduling free consultations to discuss how to get prepared.

Act Now!!!


Safety Training Resources says “enlighten, educate, and empower”…..take a practical approach to implementing and managing your occupational health program for respirable dust.

Sunday, June 26th, 2011

Enlightenment…

Crystalline Silica is one of the most abundant minerals found in the earth’s crust. Nearly all industries in our complex civilization use crystalline silica in some way. A background level of respirable silica exists in ambient air. The term “respirable” typically refers to particulates 10 micrometers or less in diameter.

Crystalline silica is one of the most significant health hazards encountered in the minerals industry. The primary health hazard is from the inhalation of respirable silica dust, which may result in silicosis and other occupational lung diseases. In more recent years inhalation of respirable crystalline silica has been identified as a risk factor in the development of lung cancer.

The control of exposures to respirable silica has long been a concern to the occupational health profession, the minerals industry, and the regulatory community (MSHA). The current emphasis and increased enforcement of CFR 56.5002 is meant to hold your company accountable for proper and systematic monitoring of the workplace environment and the respiratory health status of your employees for the purpose of adequately protecting the workforce from the effects of overexposure to respirable crystalline silica.

Educate everyone…


Your company’s safety training program should provide a general review of respiratory health effects and the various routes by which airborne silica can exert its adverse influence on the respiratory system. It should describe the symptoms of overexposure. And finally, your safety training should reference the health risks associated with exposure to respirable crystalline silica.

Workplace dust sampling surveys can be conducted by an industrial hygienist or a non industrial hygienist such as a laboratory technician, quality control analyst, safety officer, or a similar person within the company (Safety Training Resources).

Dust sampling methods are to be both qualitative and quantitative.

While initial dust sampling is used to identify jobs, areas and equipment that may need dust control attention, in most work environments initial dust sampling is rarely sufficient to reliably reflect actual long-term worker exposure. To compensate for variation in dust levels, re-sampling is most always required. Re-sampling is conducted for a variety of reasons, such as gauging the efficiency of dust controls when introduced or modified, documenting the effect of process changes, and as a means to more reliably document worker exposure over time. MSHA has suggested that the minimum standard should be 2 employees being monitored twice per year.

Your company needs to establish dust controls when sampling indicates the need. Commonly applied dust control techniques intended to minimize respirable crystalline silica exposures begin with personal respiratory protection and end with substitution and engineering practices.

Empower with a purpose…

Safety Training Resources is prepared to help your company implement and manage your occupational health program for respirable dust. We have the knowledge and equipment to minimize the risk of overexposure and compliance. Act Now!


Safety Training Resources Tightens Safety Toolbelt

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

Safety Training Resources provides a variety of MSHA approved weekly ToolBox talks that can be used by Missouri’s small mine operators to hold safety and health discussions for their employees at their mining operations.  Safety Training Resources hopes these ToolBox talks will help small mine operators and their miners to keep safety and health at the forefront of their daily and weekly activities.

Week Topic Week Topic
Blue TriangleWeek 1 Our Safety & Health Goals Blue TriangleWeek 2 Hard Hats, Eye Protection, and Protective Footwear
Blue TriangleWeek 3 Speed Limits, Mobile Equipment, and Riders Blue TriangleWeek 4 Lock Out/Tagout Procedures, and Safety Belts in Vehicles, Guardrails, Handrails, & Steps
Blue TriangleWeek 5 Heat Exhaustion, Housekeeping, and Overhead Power Lines Blue TriangleWeek 6 Guards, Lifting, and Report Injuries
Blue TriangleWeek 7 Teamwork and Hearing Protection Blue TriangleWeek 8 Attitude, Respirators, and Skin Rashes
Blue TriangleWeek 9 Fall Hazards, Safe Work Procedures, and Short Cuts Blue TriangleWeek 10 Flammable Liquids and Fire Extinguishers
Blue TriangleWeek 11 Pry Bars, Personal Safety, and Hand Safety Blue TriangleWeek 12 Compressed Airlines, Clothing, and Personal Protective Equipment - Hearing
Blue TriangleWeek 13 Handrails and Steps and Oxygen-Acetylene Torch Safety Blue TriangleWeek 14 Safety Lines, Crane Safety, and Personal Protective Equipment - Eye Protection
Blue TriangleWeek 15 Removing Bucket Teeth, Personal Conduct, and Storage Areas Blue TriangleWeek 16 Operator Fitness, Cleaning with Water or Fire Hoses, and Safe Access
Blue TriangleWeek 17 Conveyor Safety, Using a Shovel and Pump Safety Blue TriangleWeek 18 Hydraulic Systems, Tag Out Mobile Equipment Not In Service, and Label Containers
Blue TriangleWeek 19 Handrails and Walkways, Drugs and Alcohol, and Radios and Cassettes Blue TriangleWeek 20 Stockpile and Highwall Safety, Housekeeping and Driving Safety – Backing Up
Blue TriangleWeek 21 Avoid Hand Tool Injuries, Personal Protective Equipment, and Life Jackets or Work Vests Blue TriangleWeek 22 Help Reduce Injury to Others, Portable Electric Tools, and Floor Openings
Blue TriangleWeek 23 Report Unsafe Conditions, Belt Conveyors, and Welding Blue TriangleWeek 24 Dress the Part- “Let’s get it on,” Chain Hoists and Come-Alongs, and First Aid – Infections
Blue TriangleWeek 25 Falls From Equipment, Circle of Life, and Safety Harness Blue TriangleWeek 26 Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke
Blue TriangleWeek 27 Personal Conduct, Operating Service Pickup Trucks, and Fire Prevention and Control Blue TriangleWeek 28 Lightning Precautions, Crane Operations, and Mobile Equipment
Blue TriangleWeek 29 Containers, Backing Equipment, and Lifting Procedures Blue TriangleWeek 30 Working in Hot Weather, Electrical Safety, and Take a Few Minutes for Safety-General Safety Precautions
Blue TriangleWeek 31 Oxygen – Acetylene Cutting Torches, Compressed Gases, and Eye Protection Blue TriangleWeek 32 Drills, Grinders, and Welding Accessories
Blue TriangleWeek 33 Welding Courtesy, Oxygen – Acetylene Cutting Torches, and Jump Starting Batteries Blue TriangleWeek 34 Hand Tools, Chains and Come-Alongs, and Teamwork
Blue TriangleWeek 35 Accidents Don’t Just Happen, Attitude, and Eyes Blue TriangleWeek 36 Injuries, Stay Alert, and Look Where You Are Walking
Blue TriangleWeek 37 Ladders and Berms Blue TriangleWeek 38 Striking Tools, Hammers, and The Three “C’s” of Driving
Blue TriangleWeek 39 Safety Lines, Get Help, and Back Support Belt Blue TriangleWeek 40 Equipment Inspection, Housekeeping, and Watch Your Step
Blue TriangleWeek 41 Ladders, Personal Protective Equipment, and Rigging for a lift Blue TriangleWeek 42 Mobile Equipment, Personal Items, and Housekeeping
Blue TriangleWeek 43 Hand Safety, Safety Lines, and Mobile Equipment Blue TriangleWeek 44 Equipment Operators, Lockout Procedures, and Flammable Liquids
Blue TriangleWeek 45 Fire Extinguishers, Fire Safety, and Office Safety Blue TriangleWeek 46 Crane Safety – Manual/Operating Information and Crane Safety – Operation, and Watch Your Step
Blue TriangleWeek 47 Belt Conveyor Safety, Forklift Safety, and Electrical Safety Blue TriangleWeek 48 Mobile Equipment, Equipment Operation, and Safety Objective
Blue TriangleWeek 49 Compressed Gas Cylinders, Defective Tools, and Power Tools Blue TriangleWeek 50 Pickup Truck Safety, Concentration, and Lubricating Equipment
Blue TriangleWeek 51 Falls From Equipment, Teamwork, and Fire Extinguishers Blue TriangleWeek 52 General Safety Rules and General Safety Rules

MSHA and OSHA are “making President Obama’s promise a reality”.

Sunday, January 23rd, 2011

As the President said, “we owe them more than prayers. We owe them action. We owe them accountability. We owe them an assurance that when they go to work every day…. they are not alone. They ought to know that behind them there is a company that’s doing what it takes to protect them, and a government that is looking out for their safety.”

Joseph Main, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, testified before the U.S. Senate that “we do not just face a mine safety crisis in this country; we face a workplace safety crisis.”

Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, has proclaimed that OSHA has focused its attention, resources and resolve on developing and strongly enforcing OSHA standards — to send the strongest message possible to outlaw employers.

MSHA and OSHA have identified the weaknesses in the tools they have to enforce the law and are steadily increasing their enforcement presence throughout the country.
Federal law places the responsibility for compliance with safety and health standards on mine operators and employers to ensure the safety of all American workers.

While tough enforcement is critical to having safer workplaces, MSHA and OSHA cannot be everywhere, every day on every shift. That is why employees are safest when employers take responsibility for preventing violations and hazards, not when MSHA/OSHA cite them.

For years, MSHA and OSHA have been dealing with the “catch-me-if-you-can” model of workplace safety and health.  Both agencies are implementing aggressive changes in policy and penalty in response to this phenomenon.  The likelihood of your company being caught and having to deal with the consequences are far greater today than ever before.

The only ”best practice” is to take full responsibility for compliance.  Mine operators and employers need to demonstrate courage and composure as they implement change and improvements to ensure safer and healthier workplaces.

Safety Training Resources conducts comprehensive Site Audits that inspect for safety hazards and violations .  This third-party investment is the single most important step towards preventing a near miss, incident, or fatality in the workplace. 

Act Now! 


Safety Training Resources asks if you have seen the new face of safety in 2011? Are you prepared for increased OSHA/MSHA enforcement?

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

MSHA Educators sharing "best practices" with Missouri Mine Operators

Unless you’ve been living in a cave, you’ve probably heard the news by now: President Obama’s OSHA and MSHA are emboldened, energized, and focused with laser-like intensity on a host of new enforcement initiatives, tougher penalties, aggressive rulemaking activities, and reduced emphasis on compliance assistance.

Are you prepared to stay compliant?

You should know:

  • The latest on the new Severe Violators Enforcement Program, and new procedures for informal settlement of cases
  • OSHA’s position on civil penalties and criminal prosecution
  • How to prepare for the revamped National Emphasis Program on recordkeeping and other targeting initiatives
  • What’s likely to occur with the OSHA reform legislation (in both the Republican House and the Democratic Senate)
  • Whether MSHA reform legislation will re-emerge and become a possible model for more changes to OSHA
  • What is occurring concerning whistleblower protection changes at OSHA and MSHA
  • Understanding the “I2P2″ initiative, and what it means for regulation of ergonomics
  • What you need to do now to prepare for MSHA and OSHA’s enforcement initiatives

Missouri Mine Operators get "hands-on" with dust sampling equipment.


Safety Training Resources says “enlighten, educate, and empower”…..take a practical approach to implementing and managing your occupational health program for respirable dust.

Monday, January 17th, 2011

Enlightenment…

Crystalline Silica is one of the most abundant minerals found in the earth’s crust. Nearly all industries in our complex civilization use crystalline silica in some way. A background level of respirable silica exists in ambient air. The term “respirable” typically refers to particulates 10 micrometers or less in diameter.

Crystalline silica is one of the most significant health hazards encountered in the minerals industry. The primary health hazard is from the inhalation of respirable silica dust, which may result in silicosis and other occupational lung diseases. In more recent years inhalation of respirable crystalline silica has been identified as a risk factor in the development of lung cancer.

The control of exposures to respirable silica has long been a concern to the occupational health profession, the minerals industry, and the regulatory community (MSHA). The current emphasis and increased enforcement of CFR 56.5002 is meant to hold your company accountable for proper and systematic monitoring of the workplace environment and the respiratory health status of your employees for the purpose of adequately protecting the workforce from the effects of overexposure to respirable crystalline silica.

Educate everyone…

Your company’s safety training program should provide a general review of respiratory health effects and the various routes by which airborne silica can exert its adverse influence on the respiratory system. It should describe the symptoms of overexposure. And finally, your safety training should reference the health risks associated with exposure to respirable crystalline silica.

Workplace dust sampling surveys can be conducted by an industrial hygienist or a non industrial hygienist such as a laboratory technician, quality control analyst, safety officer, or a similar person within the company (Safety Training Resources).

Dust sampling methods are to be both qualitative and quantitative.

While initial dust sampling is used to identify jobs, areas and equipment that may need dust control attention, in most work environments initial dust sampling is rarely sufficient to reliably reflect actual long-term worker exposure. To compensate for variation in dust levels, re-sampling is most always required. Re-sampling is conducted for a variety of reasons, such as gauging the efficiency of dust controls when introduced or modified, documenting the effect of process changes, and as a means to more reliably document worker exposure over time. MSHA has suggested that the minimum standard should be 2 employees being monitored twice per year.

Your company needs to establish dust controls when sampling indicates the need. Commonly applied dust control techniques intended to minimize respirable crystalline silica exposures begin with personal respiratory protection and end with substitution and engineering practices.

Empower with a purpose

Safety Training Resources is prepared to help your company implement and manage your occupational health program for respirable dust. We have the knowledge and equipment to minimize the risk of overexposure and compliance. Act Now!


Noise and Dust Monitoring Solutions in Missouri offered by Safety Training Resources

Monday, January 10th, 2011

MSHA is actively enforcing dust and noise regulations. It has initiated programmed inspections that will regulate dust and noise exposure in the workplace.

As of January 1, 2011 MSHA is no longer providing dust and noise monitoring. Mine operators are responsible for having controls in place and conducting their own sampling. This is a shift from MSHA’s enforcement of overexposures to MSHA enforcement of the mine operators’ requirement to conduct health hazard surveys and make appropriate changes to ensure miners are not overexposed to contaminants. Mine operators must demonstrate compliance rather than relying on enforcement interventions.

Are you willfully exposing your workers to dangerously high levels of hazardous dust and/or noise? Do you have a Safety Strategy in place that addresses workplace exposure?

Safety Training Resources is partnering with companies just like yours to plan and implement dust and noise programs. We have the knowledge and equipment to conduct surveys as frequently as necessary.

5 W’s and How…Your Solution to Dust and Noise Compliance

Who? – US Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration
What? – Increased focus on Dust and Noise exposure monitoring
Where? – Metal and Nonmetal Mines throughout the United States
When? – Right Now!
Why? – To protect miners from overexposure to harmful levels of dust and noise, and to ensure mine operators have the required safety programs in place to meet the standard.
How? – Safety Training Resources has the knowledge and experience to assist mine operators in planning and implementing programs to protect miners and conduct workplace surveys for both dust and noise exposure.

Safety Training Resources will:

  • Conduct a Site Audit
  • Write Dust and Noise Exposure Plans
  • Identify Control Measures
  • Assist in program implementation
  • Conduct dust and noise exposure monitoring

ACT NOW!


Safety Training Resources Partners With Missouri Businesses

Saturday, January 1st, 2011

Safety Training Resources is building strong relationships with Missouri businesses to help them manage and better understand their responsibilities when it comes to safety and health programs.  Jeff Viehmann, President of Safety Training Resources, believes that creating and maintaining a safe workplace “makes good sense and means good business, strong morale, and a healthy bottom line”.  He also understands that “it’s the law!”

Safety Training Resources is committed to providing comprehensive safety services and products that will protect your business and help keep your workers safe. The company believes in listening to its customers and adapting to their needs.  Jeff Viehmann promises that “we will meet with you to understand your company’s safety goals and financial disciplines”.  Safety Training Resources partners with its customers to build safety and health programs that protect employees and contractors, reduce losses and insurance costs, ensure government compliance and protect your reputation.

Safety Training Resources specializes in:

  • OSHA 10-Hour and 30-Hour Training (General & Construction Industry)
  • MSHA Part 46 New Miner Training
  • Noise Sampling
  • Dust Sampling
  • Written Safety Programs
  • Safety Audits
  • Equipment-specific training
  • Safety Training on individual safety topics, i.e.; Confined Spaces, Fall Protection, Basic First Aid,

Whether you need training on a single topic or a comprehensive written safety program, Safety Training Resources has the knowledge and experience to enhance your company’s safety culture.

For more information about Safety Training Resources call Jeff Viehmann, president at 314-808-3502 or email him at j.viehmann@safetytrainingresources.com.